copenhagen travel guide: the copenhagen card

When I was researching things to do in Copenhagen, I came across the website for the Copenhagen card, which is supposed to save travelers money. It includes unlimited public transportation, “free” admission to popular tourist attractions, and discounts on restaurants and sightseeing tours. 

We only had one and a half days to see all Copenhagen had to offer, so I knew I had to be selective in what we were going to do. On the Copenhagen card website, you can choose which attractions you’d like to see (I chose Tivoli Gardens, Canal Tours Copenhagen, the Round Tower, and Rosenborg Castle), then see how much you save by buying the Copenhagen card. It was supposed to save us 28 euros.

canal tours copenhagen

After our walking tour, the first thing we did was the canal tour of Copenhagen. The sun popped out long enough to bathe us in warmth while we took a leisurely boat ride through Copenhagen. Our guide was informative and relatively interesting. It was an efficient way to see all the sights from a different vantage point. 

rosenborg castle

Rosenborg Castle is listed on the Copenhagen card as the fourth most-visited place in Copenhagen. It was built in the 17th century by King Christian IV. There’s free WiFi at the castle, which allows you to connect to an online guide of the castle so you know what you’re looking at. It’s not perfect, but it’s better than wandering aimlessly through the castle without knowing what you’re looking at anyway. The big draw at Rosenborg castle is the crown jewels. 

the round tower

The Round Tower (or Rundetaarn) offers up great 360-degree views of Copenhagen. It was commissioned by aforementioned King Christian VI. It was almost like a squatter, wider version of Pisa, except instead of hundreds of stairs, you make your way to the top by following a ramp. It’s about as useful as the tower of Pisa, too. It was intended to be an astrological tower when it was built, but now it’s just a tourist destination. We were in and out of there in less than an hour.

tivoli gardens

According to TripAdvisor, Tivoli Gardens is the second most popular tourist attraction in Copenhagen, behind only Nyhavn. It’s just an amusement park; supposedly, Disney World was modeled after Tivoli Gardens. There are tons of rides, lots of places to get expensive carnival food, two handfuls of restaurants, and some really beautiful gardens. We sat outside and had a drink as afternoon slid into evening. At dinnertime, we walked around looking for a restaurant that sounded good, but we ended up at the Tivoli Food Hall instead, which offered up quite an array of cuisines. We ended up eating, of all things, Mexican food at Zocalo, and it was freaking delicious. We ended the night by getting churros. It was a nice way to while away a few hours, but I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s a “must-see” in Copenhagen.

was the copenhagen card worth it?

When we got back from our cruise, I sat down to figure out whether the Copenhagen card was really worth it. My consensus? It wasn’t worth it for us. 

  • Entrance to the Rosenborg Castle: 110 DKK (14 euros)
  • Entrance to Tivoli Gardens: 120 DKK (16.08 euros)
  • Fee for the Canal Tours Copenhagen: 85 DKK (11.39 euros)
  • Entrance to the Round Tour: 5 DKK (.67 euros)
  • Total: 42.88 euros

We paid 77 euros per person for the 48-hour Copenhagen card. We had planned on doing some stuff in the morning before our cruise, but when we woke up that Monday morning, it cold, and windy, and rainy, so we ended up going straight to the cruise ship. It seems unlikely that we spent 30-some euros on transportation for one train ride and a few bus rides. Perhaps it would have been worth it if we’d been there another day. The Copenhagen card does include a lot of attractions. But I don’t think it saved us any money. Maybe we evened out somehow, I’m not sure. Just something to think about if you’re going to Copenhagen and are considering getting the Copenhagen card yourself. 😉

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